How I Learned to Promote my Artwork while Living in the Middle of Nowhere*

“Left a good Job in the City. Workin’ for the Man Every Night and Day…” Proud Mary, John Fogarty 

Thirteen years ago,  my husband and I ditched our jobs in the big city and moved to this sparsely populated province. Our dreams were all about creativity and community.  I yearned for the luxury of having time to paint.  I yearned for nature. And I hoped I would be able to find a market for my artwork. Continue reading

A Virtual Paint-In and Auction Happens this Weekend for Paint the Town, Aug 15, 16, 17, 2020

Paint the Town is THIS WEEKEND…. but with a Covid-19 twist.

Instead of hordes of artists and collectors congregating in Annapolis Royal for this annual arts festival, the event has been scaled down and will be online.

For me, this means I can paint at home in my studio and garden and post pictures of my progress online on Instagram and Facebook. So will a total of 25 artists. Continue reading

My Floral Paintings Hop to the Rabbit House

On Saturday March 31, I’ll be in a group show with potters Deb Kuzyk & Ray Mackie and painter Wayne Boucher. It’s another example of my dream-come-true in moving to Nova Scotia. This time, you’re invited! But let me start at the beginning.

Over 10 years ago, on my very first visit to the Annapolis Valley, I wandered into the Lucky Rabbit Pottery Store in Annapolis Royal. I was blown away.

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The Tough Paint Job – Naming the Baby

My exhibition in Bear River opens in 6 days and I’m finishing up edges of paintings and varnishing and putting the wiring on the backs of the canvases. (Thank you Larry for that part.)

This part is fairly tedious compared to painting and I have to hold myself back from starting anything new.

And now, in my opinion, I am faced with the toughest job – finding titles for the paintings. Continue reading

The Journey and Process in Life and Painting

I paint because I’m in love with my subject and I am delighted by the process of applying colour to a blank surface.

In the book Art and Fear the writers suggest that the observers who admire the finished piece of work have no interest in the artist’s process:

MAKING ART AND VIEWING ART ARE DIFFERENT AT THEIR CORE. To all reviewers but yourself, what matters is the product: the finished artwork…In fact there’s generally no good reason why others should care about most of any one artist’s work. The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction of your artwork that soars.  One of the basic and difficult lessons every artist must learn is that even the failed pieces are essential.

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